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  1. Validate that my existing Chrome bookmarks and apps are indeed available on the new computer once I sign in. << DONE
  2. Browse the web! (Duh.) << DONE
  3. Plug in my Blue Snowball and Eyeball 2.0 and attempt to use them with GTalk.
  4. Browse to the Squeezebox Server instance on my Windows Home Server to listen to music. << Squeezebox didn’t work.  I got this going with Firefly Media Server and Fireplay.  However, couldn’t save the Fireplay web page as a bookmark or app. Filed a bug report.
  5. Plug in my digital camera and iPhone to upload pictures and video to Flickr. << Plugged in my iPhone and couldn’t browse the file system while trying to use Flickr’s web uploader.  Filed  a bug report.
  6. See, what, if any, of my podcast production workflow might be able to be done using ChromeOS.
  7. Carry it in a side pocket of my main work laptop case and use it while on the go. << DONE.  When you’ve got six geeks ogling your new tech toy, you know it’s popular. :)
  8. (New) Edited my WordPress blog!

 

I received a Google CR-48 netbook from their Pilot Program yesterday.  One of the first things I wanted to do with it was get it to play music from my home library, which is hosted on my Windows Home Server.  I have used both Firefly Media Server and Squeezebox Server on there for a few years.  Firefly serves out iTunes-compatible DAAP, and Squeezebox Server can serve to Squeezebox-compatible clients like MainSqueeze on the Roku.  Since I knew Squeezebox had an HTTP interface, I thought it would be the way to integrate with ChromeOS.  But I’d forgotten that that was only a control interface; playback happened on a device, not the web page itself.

That reminded me of the Fireplay add-on for Firefly, which I had read about but never had a need to use.  While there is a packaged add-on of it available for WHS, installing that didn’t put the necessary files in the Firefly web interface directory.  Manually putting the files in the directory and restarting the Firefly service did the trick.  Fireplay is a flash-based player that communicates directly with the Firefly Media Server.

Fireplay on ChromeOS

Brief instructions:

  1. Obtain and install Firefly Media Server.  I have mine configured to use port 9999 for its web service.  It has an admin password, but not a music (streaming) password.
  2. Obtain Fireplay from here.
  3. Unzip the Fireplay files into your Firefly instance’s admin-root folder; mine’s at “C:\Program Files\Firefly Media Server\admin-root”.  Detailed directions are here.
  4. Restart the Firefly Media Server service.
  5. Browse to the Firefly server using a URL like “http://<servername&gt;:<port>/FirePlay.html”; mine is http://ghostrider:9999/FirePlay.html
  6. Login with a blank username and your admin (not music) password.
  7. Enjoy!
  1. Validate that my existing Chrome bookmarks and apps are indeed available on the new computer once I sign in.
  2. Browse the web! (Duh.)
  3. Plug in my Blue Snowball and Eyeball 2.0 and attempt to use them with GTalk.
  4. Browse to the Squeezebox Server instance on my Windows Home Server to listen to music.
  5. Plug in my digital camera and iPhone to upload pictures and video to Flickr.
  6. See, what, if any, of my podcast production workflow might be able to be done using ChromeOS.
  7. Carry it in a side pocket of my main work laptop case and use it while on the go.

Here’s hoping I’ll get to play with one of these over the Christmas holiday.

Update: I received a CR-48 today! Will be unboxing later tonight.

about.me

Alex Harden

Alex Harden

Musician & IT Pro

alex harden is: aged 43 years · married to melissa · ryan’s and zachary’s dad · a computer geek · a prog & hard rock music fan · an audio nerd · a bass player · a cyclist · a football enthusiast · a/k/a cygnus · thinking local and acting global · hard to categorize

@aharden

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